Bev's Blog

Thu, Aug 21, 2014 9:02 am

"Josh" was general counsel of a federal agency. He came to coaching after a staff survey helped him realize that many of the lawyers working for him felt under-appreciated. And they had real concerns about his leadership style.

Josh's initial reaction was defensive and disdainful. He said, "Grown-up lawyers shouldn't expect to be thanked just for doing excellent work. They get paid, don't they? And when I don't comment they should know everything is OK, because I always tell them when they screw up."

Fri, Aug 8, 2014 10:25 am

"Bob," my coaching client, had recently changed jobs and was unsure about his new team. He said about his staff, "They're great. Really good people. They have a lot of skills. But, somehow, they're not real professional."

Bob liked his new team members and believed they had potential. But, while he couldn't put his finger on why, he felt the team's performance was less than it could be. As he thought about his first year goals, the challenge he took up was to help his team become "more professional."

Tue, Jul 22, 2014 9:08 am

Lately I keep finding myself in conversations about how a surprising number of women aren't moving confidently into leadership within their careers. I've heard some worries from my executive coaching clients, but often the topic has come up at social or business events.

For me it's a puzzle: why is it that so many terrific professional women are still struggling with issues we thought we'd be able to put to rest back in the 80s and 90s?

Mon, Jul 7, 2014 8:19 am

Have you noticed that some people can go from success to success, while others stumble fairly quickly, then seem to spend more time down than up? Of course luck can help, but the people who keep landing on their feet tend to have something in common. The perennial winners don't take success for granted — they keep hustling, even in the good times.

Thu, Jun 26, 2014 8:37 am

What if a headhunter calls today with an interesting job possibility? Can you quickly show that you're an ideal candidate? Or what if a new boss or client has questions about how you've been using your time?

Sometimes new opportunities or unexpected challenges pop up fast. But when you're asked to quickly explain what you've been doing on the job, you might not be prepared to gracefully describe your achievements. Some people even go blank when asked to talk about what they've done lately.

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