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Abortion rights advocates and abortion rights opponents demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court

Lawyer in a landmark abortion rights case discusses a potential Roe reversal

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — A leaked early draft of a coming Supreme Court decision suggests Roe v. Wade could be struck down. The landmark decision established the constitutional right to abortion and the last major challenge to it came in a 1992 case called Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey. Kathryn Kolbert, an attorney… Read More

People shop in The Galleria mall in Houston

Inequality persists as the U.S. economy recovers from the pandemic

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The latest jobs report for April shows the U.S. capping a year of solid growth. Employers added 428,000 jobs and the unemployment rate remains steady at 3.6 percent, a pandemic-era low. But inequality continues as the economy recovers from the pandemic. Maurice Jones, former Virginia commerce secretary and HUD official, and… Read More

People get tested inside their vehicles at a Covid-19 testing station

A WHO report finds nearly 15 million deaths associated with COVID-19 worldwide

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Nearly 15 million people around the world have died from COVID’s impact, directly or indirectly, during the first two years of the pandemic, according to a new World Health Organization report. It’s also about three times higher than governments have reported so far. University of Washington’s Jonathan Wakefield, whose modeling work… Read More

The NATO flag flies in the wind

NATO to deploy more troops near Ukraine as Russia’s military aims remain ‘out of reach’

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — NATO announced Thursday it was increasing the number of multinational troops that will be deployed to four NATO member countries near Ukraine, including Slovakia, Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria. Retired Lt. Gen. Doug Lute, who served on the National Security Council staff and was U.S. ambassador to NATO during the Obama administration,… Read More

A white-tailed deer stands in a wooded area

Scientists discover shockingly high rates of COVID infections among white-tailed deer

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Scientists have recently discovered what they are calling a silent outbreak of coronavirus among white-tailed deer. PBS NewsHour’s William Brangham reports about how one of the most ubiquitous species in North America contracted COVID, and what that means for the future of the pandemic.

A CVS COVID-19 testing sign is seen on the campus of Ohio Univerisy, in Athens, Ohio, on Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021. [Joseph Scheller | WOUB]

Understanding the new CDC guidelines for those exposed to, or suffering from, COVID-19

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends a shorter isolation period for COVID-19 patients, from 10 days to five — if asymptomatic — followed by five days of mask wearing. The new guidance comes as the U.S. is averaging more than 230,000 new cases per day. Dr. Mati Hlatshwayo… Read More

Elsa Estrada, 6, smiles at her mother as pharmacist Sylvia Uong applies an alcohol swab to her arm before administering the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a pediatric vaccine clinic for children ages 5 to 11 set up at Willard Intermediate School in Santa Ana, Calif. Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021.

The U.S. sees rise in pediatric COVID patients as WHO warns of global ‘tsunami’ of cases

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The World Health Organization is warning of a global “tsunami” of COVID cases as the omicron surge builds on the delta wave. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting a significant surge in U.S. pediatric hospital admissions in the last week, particularly in Illinois, Ohio, Florida, New Jersey and… Read More

A reporter holds up an example of the amount of fentanyl that can be deadly

A rare look inside one Mexican cartel’s fentanyl operation, and how the drug reaches the U.S.

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The opioid epidemic has ravaged the United States, with the drug fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, delivering particularly fatal outcomes. Fentanyl’s high potency combined with its low production cost has allowed powerful Mexican cartels to create and sell the drug in massive quantities. With the support of the Pulitzer Center, special NewsHour correspondent… Read More

Dawson Springs on Dec. 11, 2021, the afternoon following the largest tornado system to ever hit the state.

Kentucky tornado recovery continues, with charities and government providing aid

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PADUCAH, Ky. (NewsHour) — The tornadoes that swept through the midsouth region one week ago left thousands homeless and killed at least 77 people in Kentucky alone. It was the single worst tornado disaster in that state’s history. This weekend charities, churches and government agencies are focused on helping those who need shelter and supplies…. Read More

Dawson Springs on Dec. 11, 2021, the afternoon following the largest tornado system to ever hit the state.

Kentucky communities in shock as death toll from tornadoes rises

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PADUCAH, Ky. (NewsHour) — Search and rescue operations continue across several states after the devastation caused by the tornado outbreak in the central and southern U.S. Kentucky has reported scores of deaths after tornadoes tore across the western part of the state. WOUB alumnus and current Ohio Valley ReSource reporter/WKMS Assistant News Director Liam Niemeyer,… Read More

Shipping containers sit stacked at a port in Bayonne, N.J.

Analyzing the shipping backlog from one of America’s busiest ports

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The latest jobs report Friday offered mixed signals about the state of hiring, but one thing was clear: more people are trying to get back into the labor force. Supply chain issues are one key challenge as companies compete for workers and wait for products to reach customers. NewsHour’s Economics correspondent… Read More

An isle at the grocery store without customers

How inflation, climate change and energy costs are pushing up food prices

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — In the US, inflation is now above six percent, and globally, food prices are at their highest since 2011. Climate change, energy demands and inflation are causing shortages and driving up costs in some of the poorest nations. Wall Street Journal reporter Samantha Pearson joins NewsHour’s Hari Sreenivasan from Sao Paulo,… Read More

A row of desks in a classroom with a backpack hanging up on the back wall

How some school districts around the country are coping with staff shortages, other pandemic disruptions

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Public schools across the U.S. are taking a break for Thanksgiving after a more traditional fall semester that saw students largely back in their classes in person. But many teachers and staff did not return this year, causing a shortage of teachers, substitutes, bus drivers, custodians and more. In some cases,… Read More

A healthcare worker prepares Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccines for third doses at a senior living facility in Worcester, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2021.

COVID boosters and what you need to know before holiday gatherings

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Starting this weekend, COVID-19 boosters will now be available for any of the three federally approved vaccines. At least 10 states had already made this change as COVID cases rose — climbing by 33 percent in the last two weeks. For the moment, death rates are stable. But the country is… Read More

A cell phone

Kids’ mental health and safety in the spotlight as social media execs face Congress

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NPR) — A Senate committee is widening its investigation into the impact social media platforms have on children, teens and young adults, with more apps facing congressional scrutiny. NewsHour’s William Brangham reports with Jean Twenge, a psychology professor and author of “iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant,… Read More

The end of an Ethernet cable

A cooperative effort to bridge the digital divide with low-cost WiFi

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — A new community-owned internet cooperative is helping to bridge the digital divide for underserved New Yorkers by providing low cost wifi systems. The People’s Choice cooperative has five hubs in the Bronx and may expand to more New York housing complexes soon. NewsHour’s Laura Fong reports as part of their ongoing… Read More

The John Amos power station in West Virginia

How Dem debate over Biden climate agenda could affect U.S. economy

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The coming weeks will be pivotal for President Joe Biden’s domestic agenda as Congress and the White House debate the trade-offs of a major bill that could affect the pocketbooks, working conditions and social safety net for Americans. NewsHour’s William Brangham looks at what it could mean for coping with climate… Read More

A health care worker administers a COVID-19 vaccination

What parents need to know about vaccinating young children against COVID-19

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The White House laid out plans Wednesday for children between the ages of 5 and 11 to soon receive the COVID-19 vaccine. If approved, shots could begin as soon as November. But many parents are still wondering about whether to get their children vaccinated. Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, lead epidemiologist for the… Read More

Crowd of people protesting. Protest, uprising, march or strike in city street. Anonymous activist fist up.

Growing number of U.S. workers are pushing back against employers during “Striketober”

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees union reached an agreement on a new film and TV contract this weekend, averting a strike that would have ground productions around the country to a halt. But it’s not the only showdown between workers and businesses, especially after over a year of risky and… Read More

A technician from the Findlay College of Pharmacy fills a syringe with a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a clinic in Reynoldsburg, February 2021.

Booster shots challenge governments during global vaccine inequality

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — COVID-19 was the number one cause of death for people between the ages of 35 to 54 during some months since the pandemic began last year, according to recent data. Meanwhile, as the Delta variant continues to drive infections around the world, the push for booster shots in the U.S. has… Read More