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The end of an Ethernet cable

A cooperative effort to bridge the digital divide with low-cost WiFi

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — A new community-owned internet cooperative is helping to bridge the digital divide for underserved New Yorkers by providing low cost wifi systems. The People’s Choice cooperative has five hubs in the Bronx and may expand to more New York housing complexes soon. NewsHour’s Laura Fong reports as part of their ongoing… Read More

A technician from the Findlay College of Pharmacy fills a syringe with a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a clinic in Reynoldsburg, February 2021.

Booster shots challenge governments during global vaccine inequality

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — COVID-19 was the number one cause of death for people between the ages of 35 to 54 during some months since the pandemic began last year, according to recent data. Meanwhile, as the Delta variant continues to drive infections around the world, the push for booster shots in the U.S. has… Read More

Ohio Department of Health conducting tests for COVID-19 with testing equipment.

The Pandemic Influenced Americans’ Desire To Work In Health Care

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The COVID-19 pandemic laid bare many vulnerabilities in America’s healthcare system, including a worsening shortage of nurses and physicians. But recent data indicates a new surge of interest in nursing, medical and other health-related career programs. NewsHour’s Stephanie Sy has this report for their series “Rethinking College.”

Housing activists erect a sign in Swampscott, Mass. A federal freeze on most evictions is set to expire soon. The moratorium, put in place by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in September, was the only tool keeping millions of tenants in their homes.

What Renters, Landlords Should Expect As The Federal Eviction Moratorium Expires

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Throughout most of the pandemic, Americans who are behind on their rent have been safe from evictions due to a federal moratorium imposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over public health concerns. But the Supreme Court said the moratorium must expire July 31 unless Congress passes new legislation…. Read More

A demonstrator participates at a rally "Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power" to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence outside the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles Saturday, March 13, 2021.

Asian American Community Battles Surge In Hate Crimes Stirred From COVID-19

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WASHIGNTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — As the U.S. continues its battle against COVID-19, it is also battling a rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans. A recent report found that hate crimes against Asian Americans in major U.S. cities surged by nearly 150 percent in 2020 —even as the number of overall hate crimes fell. NewsHour’s… Read More

A graphic of a father holding a child

WATCH: Raising Children For A Second Time, ‘Grandfamilies’ Struggle During The Pandemic

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — More and more older adults are raising kids for the second time around because of illness, incarceration, addiction, or any number of reasons. And since the start of the pandemic, almost 40 percent of “grandfamilies” say they struggle to pay for housing, and a third have trouble accessing food. Stephanie Sy… Read More

A bottle of OxyContin with pills scattered around

WATCH: How A Powerful Corporate Consulting Firm Helped Create The Opioid Epidemic

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The opioids crisis that has taken hundreds of thousands of American lives has received less attention in the pandemic, but drug overdoses and deaths have grown during the last year. Now, one of the world’s most powerful corporate consulting firms has agreed to a major settlement for its role in the sale… Read More

Ginsburgh NewsHour Special Graphic

High Stakes: Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Legacy & The Court’s Future: A PBS NewsHour Special TONIGHT at 8 p.m.


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At this moment, the country is mourning a historic civil rights figure and a cultural icon, and people are also being torn further in political acrimony over the fight to fill her seat. NewsHour will focus on both of these major themes, with conversations with people who knew and worked with Ruth Bader Ginsburg, others… Read More

A syringe

Is The U.S. Government Paying Twice For Coronavirus Vaccine?

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — COVID-19 vaccine development continues to be the subject of political jostling, with President Trump contradicting top U.S. health officials regarding timeline and efficacy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they expect to distribute vaccines publicly at no cost to the patient. But what will the government pay, and how much… Read More

A box to drop off absentee ballots sits in the parking lot of the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections in Cleveland.

WATCH: How Election Officials And USPS Handle Mail-In Ballots

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The pandemic is pushing more voters to cast ballots by mail. While most evidence shows that voting fraud is extremely rare, President Trump has been claiming the opposite. Now he’s criticizing the idea of more funding for the U.S. Postal Service, which congressional Democrats say is needed to support the increase… Read More

College Classroom

WATCH: Parents And Students Reevaluate College Costs Amid Virtual Learning

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — For higher education, the pandemic has forced major questions about affordability and cost into the spotlight. Both students and parents are hesitant to spend tens of thousands of dollars on classes taken via video, and many feel that the loss of on-campus life upends the college value proposition entirely. Scott Galloway,… Read More

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban

WATCH: How Authoritarianism Has Spread Since The Coronavirus Pandemic Began

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — According to pro-democracy institutions, authoritarianism was on the rise globally even before the coronavirus pandemic hit. But experts say the distraction of the crisis has allowed some leaders to indulge their dictatorial impulses without attracting much attention from the people they govern. NewsHour’s Nick Schifrin reports and talks to The Atlantic’s… Read More

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies remotely during a House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, July 29, 2020, in Washington.

WATCH: Is U.S. Regulatory Framework Capable Of Reining In Big Tech Companies?

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google encountered intense scrutiny from House lawmakers on Wednesday, particularly over whether they leverage unfair business practices to prevent their competition from succeeding. Is American antitrust law sufficient to handle the rapidly changing landscape of technology? Dipayan Ghosh of the Harvard Kennedy School joins… Read More

A sign outside of the Nelsonville voter precinct lets people know where they can vote.

WATCH: How Has Campaigning Changed Amid COVID-19?

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The COVID-19 pandemic has affected campaigning not only for candidates, but also the Americans volunteering for them. PBS NewsHour’s Daniel Bush, who was recently reporting in Michigan, noticed in-person campaigning restrictions recently beginning to loosen. There is still a ban on large gatherings in most states, but some campaign volunteers are… Read More

In this July 26, 1990 file photo, President George H. W. Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House. Joining the president are, from left, Evan Kemp, chairman of the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission; Rev. Harold Wilke; Sandra Parrino, chairman of the National Council on Disability, and Justin Dart, chairman of The President's Council on Disabilities. TheAmericans with Disabilities Act, which was signed into law 25 years ago, on July 26, 1990.

WATCH: 30 Years After ADA, Inaccessibility Persists For The Disabled

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — On the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, NewsHour looks at what the landmark civil rights law, which guarantees equal access to public resources and employment to disabled people has achieved and how much work remains. Dr. Oluwaferanmi Okanlami, assistant professor at the University of Michigan and a disabled person… Read More

College Classroom

WATCH: Colleges And Universities Grapple With Decision To Return To Campus

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — U.S. colleges and universities are scrambling to finalize their fall plans as coronavirus infections continue to rise significantly in much of the country. While some students, faculty and staff are looking forward to returning to campus, others are raising serious health and safety concerns. NewsHour’s Hari Sreenivasan reports on how schools… Read More

The U.S. Supreme Court Building

WATCH: Why This Supreme Court Term Was So Unusual

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — From landmark decisions on immigration and LGBTQ protections to virtual oral arguments amid the pandemic, the Supreme Court’s recent term was certainly one for the history books. NewsHour’s Amna Nawaz talks to Paul Clement, former U.S. solicitor general under President George W. Bush, Neal Katyal, former acting solicitor general under President Obama… Read More

Offerings sit in front of a mural of slain Army Spc. Vanessa Guillen painted on a wall in the south side of Fort Worth, Texas, Saturday, July 11, 2020. U.S. Army officials say they will begin an independent review of the command climate at Fort Hood, examining claims and historical data of discrimination, harassment and assault, following calls for a more thorough investigation into the killing of the soldier from the Texas base.

WATCH: How Should The U.S. Military Respond to Vanessa Guillen’s Murder?

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The disappearance and murder of Army Specialist Vanessa Guillen has sparked an outpouring of stories from other service members. Mostly female, they say that they also experienced sexual harassment and abuse in the ranks, but felt that the military’s reporting system was not built to help them. NewsHour’s Nick Schifrin reports… Read More

The U.S. Supreme Court Building

The Supreme Court’s ‘Landmark Decision’ On Tribal Sovereignty

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court reaffirmed Native American rights to millions of acres of land in eastern Oklahoma. The 5-4 opinion granted jurisdictional control to the Muscogee Nation and extends to four neighboring tribal nations, which together make up more than half the state. Allison Herrera, a reporter for KOSU public… Read More

A caregiver tests a patient for coronavirus at University Hospitals, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.

WATCH: In States Where Coronavirus Is Surging, Reopening Plans Put On Hold

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The U.S. is now averaging roughly 40,000 new confirmed infections of COVID-19 each day. The caseload has more than doubled this month in at least 10 states, mostly in the South and the West. As some states put their reopening plans on hold, the nation’s top health experts are sounding new warnings… Read More

Uptown Athens during coronavirus emergency

WATCH: What The Latest Jobs Numbers Say About A U.S. Economic Recovery

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The number of weekly jobless claims is the lowest since the economic shutdown began in March, but it remains far above what the U.S. has experienced during other financial crises. Jerome Powell, chairman of the Federal Reserve, said earlier this week that he expects unemployment to remain elevated for years to… Read More