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Abortion rights advocates and abortion rights opponents demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court

Lawyer in a landmark abortion rights case discusses a potential Roe reversal

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — A leaked early draft of a coming Supreme Court decision suggests Roe v. Wade could be struck down. The landmark decision established the constitutional right to abortion and the last major challenge to it came in a 1992 case called Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey. Kathryn Kolbert, an attorney… Read More

People shop in The Galleria mall in Houston

Inequality persists as the U.S. economy recovers from the pandemic

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The latest jobs report for April shows the U.S. capping a year of solid growth. Employers added 428,000 jobs and the unemployment rate remains steady at 3.6 percent, a pandemic-era low. But inequality continues as the economy recovers from the pandemic. Maurice Jones, former Virginia commerce secretary and HUD official, and… Read More

A white-tailed deer stands in a wooded area

Scientists discover shockingly high rates of COVID infections among white-tailed deer

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Scientists have recently discovered what they are calling a silent outbreak of coronavirus among white-tailed deer. PBS NewsHour’s William Brangham reports about how one of the most ubiquitous species in North America contracted COVID, and what that means for the future of the pandemic.

Elsa Estrada, 6, smiles at her mother as pharmacist Sylvia Uong applies an alcohol swab to her arm before administering the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a pediatric vaccine clinic for children ages 5 to 11 set up at Willard Intermediate School in Santa Ana, Calif. Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021.

The U.S. sees rise in pediatric COVID patients as WHO warns of global ‘tsunami’ of cases

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The World Health Organization is warning of a global “tsunami” of COVID cases as the omicron surge builds on the delta wave. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting a significant surge in U.S. pediatric hospital admissions in the last week, particularly in Illinois, Ohio, Florida, New Jersey and… Read More

Dawson Springs on Dec. 11, 2021, the afternoon following the largest tornado system to ever hit the state.

Kentucky tornado recovery continues, with charities and government providing aid

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PADUCAH, Ky. (NewsHour) — The tornadoes that swept through the midsouth region one week ago left thousands homeless and killed at least 77 people in Kentucky alone. It was the single worst tornado disaster in that state’s history. This weekend charities, churches and government agencies are focused on helping those who need shelter and supplies…. Read More

Dawson Springs on Dec. 11, 2021, the afternoon following the largest tornado system to ever hit the state.

Kentucky communities in shock as death toll from tornadoes rises

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PADUCAH, Ky. (NewsHour) — Search and rescue operations continue across several states after the devastation caused by the tornado outbreak in the central and southern U.S. Kentucky has reported scores of deaths after tornadoes tore across the western part of the state. WOUB alumnus and current Ohio Valley ReSource reporter/WKMS Assistant News Director Liam Niemeyer,… Read More

Shipping containers sit stacked at a port in Bayonne, N.J.

Analyzing the shipping backlog from one of America’s busiest ports

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The latest jobs report Friday offered mixed signals about the state of hiring, but one thing was clear: more people are trying to get back into the labor force. Supply chain issues are one key challenge as companies compete for workers and wait for products to reach customers. NewsHour’s Economics correspondent… Read More

A row of desks in a classroom with a backpack hanging up on the back wall

How some school districts around the country are coping with staff shortages, other pandemic disruptions

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Public schools across the U.S. are taking a break for Thanksgiving after a more traditional fall semester that saw students largely back in their classes in person. But many teachers and staff did not return this year, causing a shortage of teachers, substitutes, bus drivers, custodians and more. In some cases,… Read More

A healthcare worker prepares Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccines for third doses at a senior living facility in Worcester, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2021.

COVID boosters and what you need to know before holiday gatherings

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Starting this weekend, COVID-19 boosters will now be available for any of the three federally approved vaccines. At least 10 states had already made this change as COVID cases rose — climbing by 33 percent in the last two weeks. For the moment, death rates are stable. But the country is… Read More

The end of an Ethernet cable

A cooperative effort to bridge the digital divide with low-cost WiFi

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — A new community-owned internet cooperative is helping to bridge the digital divide for underserved New Yorkers by providing low cost wifi systems. The People’s Choice cooperative has five hubs in the Bronx and may expand to more New York housing complexes soon. NewsHour’s Laura Fong reports as part of their ongoing… Read More

A technician from the Findlay College of Pharmacy fills a syringe with a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a clinic in Reynoldsburg, February 2021.

Booster shots challenge governments during global vaccine inequality

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — COVID-19 was the number one cause of death for people between the ages of 35 to 54 during some months since the pandemic began last year, according to recent data. Meanwhile, as the Delta variant continues to drive infections around the world, the push for booster shots in the U.S. has… Read More

Ohio Department of Health conducting tests for COVID-19 with testing equipment.

The Pandemic Influenced Americans’ Desire To Work In Health Care

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The COVID-19 pandemic laid bare many vulnerabilities in America’s healthcare system, including a worsening shortage of nurses and physicians. But recent data indicates a new surge of interest in nursing, medical and other health-related career programs. NewsHour’s Stephanie Sy has this report for their series “Rethinking College.”

Housing activists erect a sign in Swampscott, Mass. A federal freeze on most evictions is set to expire soon. The moratorium, put in place by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in September, was the only tool keeping millions of tenants in their homes.

What Renters, Landlords Should Expect As The Federal Eviction Moratorium Expires

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — Throughout most of the pandemic, Americans who are behind on their rent have been safe from evictions due to a federal moratorium imposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over public health concerns. But the Supreme Court said the moratorium must expire July 31 unless Congress passes new legislation…. Read More

A demonstrator participates at a rally "Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power" to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence outside the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles Saturday, March 13, 2021.

Asian American Community Battles Surge In Hate Crimes Stirred From COVID-19

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WASHIGNTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — As the U.S. continues its battle against COVID-19, it is also battling a rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans. A recent report found that hate crimes against Asian Americans in major U.S. cities surged by nearly 150 percent in 2020 —even as the number of overall hate crimes fell. NewsHour’s… Read More

A graphic of a father holding a child

WATCH: Raising Children For A Second Time, ‘Grandfamilies’ Struggle During The Pandemic

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — More and more older adults are raising kids for the second time around because of illness, incarceration, addiction, or any number of reasons. And since the start of the pandemic, almost 40 percent of “grandfamilies” say they struggle to pay for housing, and a third have trouble accessing food. Stephanie Sy… Read More

A bottle of OxyContin with pills scattered around

WATCH: How A Powerful Corporate Consulting Firm Helped Create The Opioid Epidemic

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — The opioids crisis that has taken hundreds of thousands of American lives has received less attention in the pandemic, but drug overdoses and deaths have grown during the last year. Now, one of the world’s most powerful corporate consulting firms has agreed to a major settlement for its role in the sale… Read More

Ginsburgh NewsHour Special Graphic

High Stakes: Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Legacy & The Court’s Future: A PBS NewsHour Special TONIGHT at 8 p.m.


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At this moment, the country is mourning a historic civil rights figure and a cultural icon, and people are also being torn further in political acrimony over the fight to fill her seat. NewsHour will focus on both of these major themes, with conversations with people who knew and worked with Ruth Bader Ginsburg, others… Read More

A syringe

Is The U.S. Government Paying Twice For Coronavirus Vaccine?

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (NewsHour) — COVID-19 vaccine development continues to be the subject of political jostling, with President Trump contradicting top U.S. health officials regarding timeline and efficacy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they expect to distribute vaccines publicly at no cost to the patient. But what will the government pay, and how much… Read More